“When you understand reasoning, you’ll see where you’re claims don’t hold or where your conclusions lack strong support”

Our invited speaker Dr. Cecile J. W. Janssens, share with us some thoughts and expectations about #EvoKEBCN21

Dear Dr. Cecile J. W. Janssens,

Question. How the theory of evolution has impacted your everyday life as a citizen?

Answer. Knowing that humans steer evolution, there isn’t a day that I am not thinking about my ecological footprint. I do many little things, but am very aware that these don’t counterbalance my frequent travels. I need to do better.

Q. By participating in EvoKE BCN 21, What do you consider would be your main contribution to increase science literacy in evolution in society?

A. Educating the public how science works, not only about evolution but in general.

Q. Among your occupations, you teach critical thinking to PhD students. Which do you think is the best approach to encourage critical thinking among the most defiant groups and individuals towards science and evolutionary theory in particular? 

Interview by Juan Gefaell

A. Assuming they are as interested as my students, I would teach them how reasoning works. What makes the difference between a strong and weak argument? When does an argument make a strong case for its conclusion and when not? When you understand reasoning, you’ll see where you’re claims don’t hold or where your conclusions lack strong support. It is an humbling experience that is not only important for defiant groups, but for all of us.